SWTU, P.O. Box 45555, Madison, WI 53744-5555 president@swtu.org

Newscasts – June 2017

  • No June, July or August Meetings
  • Fontana Grant Challenge Update
  • amazon.smile … a simple and no -cost way to give!
  • Volunteer Training Opportunities from the Dane County Land & Water Resources Department
  • Take a Dane County Parks Survey
  • Rusty Dun – Prince Nymph / Brown Forked-Tail Nymph
  • And more!

June_2017

Fly Tying: Prince Nymph / Brown Forked-Tail Nymph

Fountains of Youth – Classic trout flies that have withstood the test of time … flies that remain “forever young”

by Rusty Dunn

If someone hands you a Pheasant Tail Nymph and asks what it imitates, you’ll likely say “mayfly nymph”.  Receive an Elk Hair Caddis, and you might say “adult caddisfly, probably an egg-laying female”.  One of the many hopper patterns?  You reply without hesitation, “grasshopper … no doubt about it”.  But if you’re handed a Prince Nymph, you might be stumped.  “Uhh … umm … I’m not sure … maybe an earring?”

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Fontana Grant Challenge Update

Big thanks to everyone who contributed a donation to the Environmental Grant Challenge – and to Fontana Sports Specialties and Patagonia for their generosity.

SWTU raised $2,276 and placed 5th out of 6 contestants, which means we won a $1,000 grant!

Your donation strengthens our efforts to conserve cold water resources in our community. Thank you!

Congrats to SWTU member John Gribb, who won the $100 Fontana spending spree.

— Matt Sment, SWTU President

 

No June, July or August Meetings

Per usual, we are taking the summer off and not having regular chapter meetings in June, July or August. The busy, hot, travel-filled summer months are not generally conducive to large meetings.

That’s not to say you can’t do anything! Here are some ideas to stay active …

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New Members – June 2017

Welcome New Members

We’re pleased to announce the addition of the following new members to our ranks!

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Volunteer Training Opportunities – Land & Water Resources

Dane County Land & Water Resources DepartmentThe Dane County Land & Water Resources Department offers a variety of training for volunteers of county parks and other partner groups. A variety of trainings are available.

  • June 13: WI First Detector Network – Invasive Species Workshop – Lussier Family Heritage Center
  • July 1: Aquatic Invasive Species Landing Blitz-Lyman F. Anderson Agriculture & Conservation Center  
  • July 11: Woodland Plant ID Walk – Stewart Lake County Park

Register here

Registration note:  They use SignUp.com. Review the options listed, select a tour time, and and sign up. You will NOT need to create an account or password.

For more information, contact:

Rhea Stangel-Maier, Volunteer Coordinator
Parks Division
Dane County Land & Water Resources Department
5201 Fen Oak Drive
Madison WI 53718
(608) 224-3601stangel-maier@countyofdane.com
www.danecountyparks.com

Gordon Creek Workday Photos

SWTU Gordon Creek Workday, May 2017

Gordon Creek Stream Workday Photos

Saturday, May 7, near Blanchardville

Check out photos of our hearty Stream Team working to make a difference! Read More

Watershed Field Day

Sugar River through Neperud property

Join us for a Watershed Field Day
9 a.m.- 11 a.m. on  June 9, 2017

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New Members – May 2017

Welcome New Members

We’re pleased to announce the addition of the following new members to our ranks!

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Fly Tying: Quill Gordon

Quill Gordon fishing fly by Rusty Dunn

Fountains of Youth – Classic trout flies that have withstood the test of time … flies that remain “forever young”

by Rusty Dunn

We are a nation of immigrants … a melting pot, where cultures and traditions imported from abroad adapt, evolve, and meld into a uniquely new society. The history of American fly fishing is much the same.  Fly an­gling as we know it developed in Great Britain, often by a privileged upper class.  The methods, how­ever, emigrated to America along with the hard work­ing early settlers.  Fly angling then adapted to the new geography, took root in America’s tremen­dous natural resources, and grew into the magnifi­cent pas­time that we honor and protect today.

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